Lime in Soil

Lime Stabilization

Lime stabilization is an important part of creating the highest quality paved parking lots and roads. Stabilizing the soil below the asphalt or concrete will provide a long term, crack-free surface for your project.

Our process for stabilization can include:
• Grading
• Scarify
• Pulverizing
• Spreading Lime
• Wetting soil
• Regrading

Testing Soil Prior To Stabilization

TxDOT suggests soil samples should be taken on your property to predict how the soil will react during the chemical stabilization process. The depth of the samples should include all soil that will come in contact with or influence the stabilization area. There could also be significant moisture intrusion under the stabilized material if the water table is high on the property you need paved.

The Significance of Soil Stabilization

When lime is mixed with clayey soil, a chemical change in the materials occur. Calcium cations in the lime reduce the plasticity of clay and reduce its ability to hold moisture. The stronger material will retain its solid state as the pozzolanic reaction continues for several decades. The exact physical improvements of using this stabilizer show the soil becoming 10 times stiffer and a 20x shear strength enhancement. The high clay content of North Texas and the Dallas-Fort Worth area makes lime the preferred method for All State Paving to strengthen the soil before paving. Compared to cement stabilization, lime provides significant cost saving up to 25% for most projects.

Concrete Pavement Stabilization

When To Stabilize With Portland Cement

The only instance where portland cement would be preferred in North Texas is when time is an issue. Cement can be placed and compacted all in the same day, while lime requires 72 hours before compaction is possible. If there are low-plasticity soils on a worksite, cement is recommended. If the soil is non-plastic, cement is almost always required as the lime will have minimal effect on the non-clayey material.